How to Prepare for an Obstacle Race

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In the world of endurance sports, 2012 is the year of steeplechase, with more than 2 million people taking part in some kind of muddy challenge. The rats in the gym are easy to pass through obstacles, but they have difficulties in long distance running.

> 39, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, speed and strength, lean meat and flexibility. However, instead of dividing the exercise time into separate strength training and aerobic exercise days, it is better to regard the obstacle race training as a comprehensive exercise. In this way, you can prepare for any challenges that arise from those who create the obstacle course.

in my new book, "obstacle adaptation: you run fast, overcome challenges, discover your inner Spartan, muddy or warrior's complete training program," I'll show you how to create a multi-functional fitness level that can be completed without stopping, walking or resting.

9 training tips to survive and thrive in the next tough mud, Sparta race or other events. Enter the park: you can simulate many obstacles in the local park. Skip the fence and the picnic table. Using park benches, alternate between push ups and push ups. Climb the grassy hill and crawl under the low branches. Everything you need to train for the steeplechase can be found outside the stadium without membership.

2. Warm up: before an obstacle race or training session, it's important to warm up actively because you often use your whole body in ways you don't expect. Front and side panels, hip bows, walking lunges and side lunges not only power your movement, but also improve your ability to move and help prevent injuries. On the playground: in the obstacle race, you will be asked to navigate the horizontal bar, balance the beam, climb the wall and cross the rope. You're likely to find all these things in the local playground. This is a good excuse to play more with your children. No kids? Borrow some nieces or nephews. No kids? Use the playground during break time. Running interval: long distance jogging has a place in some training programs. Interval training can improve the speed, which is particularly important in obstacle race training. It combines running interval with obstacles. After the warm-up run, alternate between work and rest, running at 80% for 3 minutes, then walking or jogging for 3 minutes.

5. Fast running mountain: different from the stable, paved slope or Triathlon running part of road race, obstacle race is characterized by short, steep and cross-country climbing. Here, your local park can also be a perfect training ground. Sprint up the mountain and walk twice as long. Repeat several times. Be sure to keep the stride compact to prevent hamstring strain. Cross country running: cross country obstacle race. So why train on concrete or asphalt? It's harder for the body. Even in urban areas, you can run on grass along sidewalks, across parks, on gravel or gravel, or along waterways. Challenge yourself to cross-country running as much as possible, skipping sidewalks and other paved areas. Mix it up: obstacle training is not just running, of course. Simulate the rhythm and challenge of the race by stopping every half mile and doing a dozen push ups, pull ups or hiccups. You can do 30 climbs or squats. Or do a combination of two or three exercises every half mile. The key is to keep the race going, like a continuous obstacle race.

8. Creativity: the world is your obstacle. Of course, security is always the top priority. But there's no reason why you don't run around on the mountain in your local park. Those huge concrete culverts are waiting to be installed along your runway? Why don't you let the bear climb over like in the game? Don't avoid muddy paths after the rain, embrace them.

9. Be a kid again: kids are born obstacle drivers. They instinctively climb or jump to touch anything on the road. They kept running and attacking the obstacles on the playground. It's better to exercise outside than in the gym. You may find that you like it just as much as the mud race itself.